Will Eisner Winners 2019

Image
Best Short Story
  • “Get Naked in Barcelona,” by Steven T. Seagle and Emei Olivia Burell, in Get Naked (Image)
  • “The Ghastlygun Tinies,” by Matt Cohen and Marc Palm, in MAD magazine #4 (DC)
  • “Here I Am,” by Shaun Tan, in I Feel Machine (SelfMadeHero)
  • “Life During Interesting Times,” by Mike Dawson (The Nib)
  • “Supply Chains,” by Peter and Maria Hoey, in Coin-Op #7 (Coin-Op Books)
  • “The Talk of the Saints,” by Tom King and Jason Fabok, in Swamp Thing Winter Special (DC)

Image result for peter parker #310Best Single Issue/One-Shot
  • Beneath the Dead Oak Tree, by Emily Carroll (ShortBox)
  • Black Hammer: Cthu-Louise, by Jeff Lemire and Emi Lenox (Dark Horse)
  • No Better Words, by Carolyn Nowak (Silver Sprocket)
  • Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man #310, by Chip Zdarsky (Marvel)
  • The Terrible Elisabeth Dumn Against the Devils In Suits, by Arabson, translated by James Robinson (IHQ Studio/ Image)

Best Continuing Series
  • Batman, by Tom King et al. (DC)
  • Black Hammer: Age of Doom, by Jeff Lemire, Dean Ormston, and Rich Tommaso (Dark Horse)
  • Gasolina, by Sean Mackiewicz and Niko Walter (Skybound/Image)
  • Giant Days, by John Allison, Max Sarin, and Julaa Madrigal (BOOM! Box)
  • The Immortal Hulk, by Al Ewing, Joe Bennett, and Ruy José (Marvel)
  • Runaways, by Rainbow Rowell and Kris Anka (Marvel)

Image result for will eisner winners 2019 comic conBest Limited Series
  • Batman: White Knight, by Sean Murphy (DC)
  • Eternity Girl, by Magdalene Visaggio and Sonny Liew (Vertigo/DC)
  • Exit Stage Left: The Snagglepuss Chronicles, by Mark Russell, Mike Feehan, and Mark Morales (DC)
  • Mister Miracle, by Tom King and Mitch Gerads (DC)
  • X-Men: Grand Design: Second Genesis, by Ed Piskor (Marvel)

Best New Series
  • Bitter Root, by David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene (Image)
  • Crowded, by Christopher Sebela, Ro Stein, and Ted Brandt (Image)
  • Gideon Falls, by Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino (Image)
  • Isola, by Brenden Fletcher and Karl Kerschl (Image)
  • Man-Eaters, by Chelsea Cain, Lia Miternique and Kate Niemczyk (Image)
  • Skyward, by Joe Henderson and Lee Garbett (Image)

ImageBest Publication for Early Readers (up to age 8)
  • Johnny Boo and the Ice Cream Computer, by James Kochalka (Top Shelf/IDW)
  • Petals, by Gustavo Borges (KaBOOM!)
  • Peter & Ernesto: A Tale of Two Sloths, by Graham Annable (First Second)
  • This Is a Taco! By Andrew Cangelose and Josh Shipley (CubHouse/Lion Forge)
  • Tiger Vs. Nightmare, by Emily Tetri (First Second)

Best Publication for Kids (ages 9–12)
  • Aquicorn Cove, by Katie O’Neill (Oni)
  • Be Prepared, by Vera Brosgol (First Second)
  • The Cardboard Kingdom, by Chad Sell (Knopf/Random House Children’s Books)
  • Crush, by Svetlana Chmakova (JY/Yen Press)
  • The Divided Earth, by Faith Erin Hicks (First Second)

ImageBest Publication for Teens (ages 13–17)
  • All Summer Long, by Hope Larson (Farrar Straus Giroux)
  • Gumballs, by Erin Nations (Top Shelf/IDW)
  • Middlewest, by Skottie Young and Jorge Corona (Image)
  • Norroway, Book 1: The Black Bull of Norroway, by Cat Seaton and Kit Seaton (Image)
  • The Prince and the Dressmaker, by Jen Wang (First Second)
  • Watersnakes, by Tony Sandoval, translated by Lucas Marangon (Magnetic/Lion Forge)

Best Humor Publication
  • Get Naked, by Steven T. Seagle et al. (Image)
  • Giant Days, by John Allison, Max Sarin, and Julia Madrigal (BOOM! Box)
  • MAD magazine, edited by Bill Morrison (DC)
  • A Perfect Failure: Fante Bukowski 3, by Noah Van Sciver (Fantagraphics)
  • Woman World, by Aminder Dhaliwal (Drawn & Quarterly)

ImageBest Anthology
  • Femme Magnifique: 50 Magnificent Women Who Changed the World, edited by Shelly Bond (Black Crown/IDW)
  • Puerto Rico Strong, edited by Marco Lopez, Desiree Rodriguez, Hazel Newlevant, Derek Ruiz, and Neil Schwartz (Lion Forge)
  • Twisted Romance, edited by Alex de Campi (Image)
  • Where We Live: A Benefit for the Survivors in Las Vegas, edited by Will Dennis, curated by J. H. Williams III and Wendy Wright-Williams (Image)

Best Reality-Based Work
  • All the Answers: A Graphic Memoir, by Michael Kupperman (Gallery 13)
  • All the Sad Songs, by Summer Pierre (Retrofit/Big Planet)
  • Is This Guy For Real? The Unbelievable Andy Kaufman, by Box Brown (First Second)
  • Monk! by Youssef Daoudi (First Second)
  • One Dirty Tree, by Noah Van Sciver (Uncivilized Books)

ImageBest Graphic Album—New
  • Bad Girls, by Alex de Campi and Victor Santos (Gallery 13)
  • Come Again, by Nate Powell (Top Shelf/IDW)
  • Green Lantern: Earth One Vol. 1, by Corinna Bechko and Gabriel Hardman (DC)
  • Homunculus, by Joe Sparrow (ShortBox)
  • My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies, by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips (Image)
  • Sabrina, by Nick Drnaso (Drawn & Quarterly)

Best Graphic Album—Reprint
  • Berlin, by Jason Lutes (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Girl Town, by Carolyn Nowak (Top Shelf/IDW)
  • Upgrade Soul, by Ezra Claytan Daniels (Lion Forge)
  • The Vision hardcover, by Tom King, Gabriel Hernandez Walta, and Michael Walsh (Marvel)
  • Young Frances, by Hartley Lin (AdHouse Books)

Best Adaptation from Another Medium
  • Anne Frank’s Diary: The Graphic Adaptation, adapted by Ari Folman and David Polonsky (Pantheon)
  • “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley, in Frankenstein: Junji Ito Story Collection, adapted by Junji Ito, translated by Jocelyne Allen (VIZ Media)
  • Out in the Open by Jesús Carraso, adapted by Javi Rey, translated by Lawrence Schimel (SelfMadeHero)
  • Speak: The Graphic Novel, by Laurie Halse Anderson and Emily Carroll (Farrar Straus Giroux)
  • To Build a Fire: Based on Jack London’s Classic Story, by Chabouté (Gallery 13)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material
  • About Betty’s Boobby Vero Cazot and Julie Rocheleau, translated by Edward Gauvin (Archaia/BOOM!)
  • Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World, by Pénélope Bagieu, translated by Montana Kane (First Second)
  • Herakles Book 1, by Edouard Cour, translated by Jeremy Melloul (Magnetic/Lion Forge)
  • Niourk, by Stefan Wul and Olivier Vatine, translated by Brandon Kander and Diana Schutz (Dark Horse)
  • A Sea of Love, by Wilfrid Lupano and Grégory Panaccione (Magnetic/Lion Forge)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material—Asia
  • Abara: Complete Deluxe Edition, by Tsutomu Nihei, translated by Sheldon Drzka (VIZ Media)
  • Dead Dead Demon’s Dededede Destruction, by Inio Asano, translated by John Werry (VIZ Media)
  • Laid-Back Camp, by Afro, translated by Amber Tamosaitis (Yen Press)
  • My Beijing: Four Stories of Everyday Wonder, by Nie Jun, translated by Edward Gauvin (Graphic Universe/Lerner)
  • Tokyo Tarareba Girls, by Akiko Higashimura (Kodansha)

Best Archival Collection/Project—Strips
  • Pogo, vol. 5: Out of This World At Home, by Walt Kelly, edited by Mark Evanier and Eric Reynolds (Fantagraphics)
  • Sky Masters of the Space Force: The Complete Sunday Strips in Color (1959–1960), by Jack Kirby, Wally Wood et al., edited by Ferran Delgado (Amigo Comics)
  • Star Wars: Classic Newspaper Strips, vol. 3, by Archie Goodwin and Al Williamson, edited by Dean Mullaney (Library of American Comics/IDW)
  • The Temple of Silence: Forgotten Words and Worlds of Herbert Crowley, by Justin Duerr (Beehive Books
  • Thimble Theatre and the Pre-Popeye Comics of E. C. Segar, edited by Peter Maresca (Sunday Press)

View image on TwitterBest Archival Collection/Project—Comic Books
  • Action Comics: 80 Years of Superman Deluxe Edition, edited by Paul Levitz (DC)
  • Bill Sienkiewicz’s Mutants and Moon Knights… And Assassins… Artifact Edition, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW)
  • Dirty Plotte: The Complete Julie Doucet (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Madman Quarter Century Shindig, by Mike Allred, edited by Chris Ryall (IDW)
  • Terry Moore’s Strangers in Paradise Gallery Edition, edited by Bob Chapman, Joseph Melchior, and Terry Moore (Abstract Studio/Graphitti Designs)
  • Will Eisner’s A Contract with God: Curator’s Collection, edited by John Lind (Kitchen Sink/Dark Horse)

ImageBest Writer
  • Alex de Campi, Bad Girls (Gallery 13); Twisted Romance (Image)
  • Tom King, Batman, Mister Miracle, Heroes in Crisis, Swamp Thing Winter Special (DC)
  • Jeff Lemire, Black Hammer: Age of Doom, Doctor Star & the Kingdom of Lost Tomorrows, Quantum Age (Dark Horse); Descender, Gideon Falls, Royal City (Image)
  • Mark Russell, Exit Stage Left: The Snagglepuss Chronicles, Green Lantern/Huckleberry Hound, Lex Luthor/Porky Pig (DC); Lone Ranger (Dynamite)
  • Kelly Thompson, Nancy Drew (Dynamite); Hawkeye, Jessica Jones, Mr. & Mrs. X, Rogue & Gambit, Uncanny X-Men, West Coast Avengers (Marvel)
  • Chip Zdarsky, Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man, Marvel Two-in-One (Marvel)

Best Writer/Artist
  • Sophie Campbell, Wet Moon (Oni)
  • Nick Drnaso, Sabrina (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • David Lapham, Lodger (Black Crown/IDW); Stray Bullets (Image)
  • Nate Powell, Come Again (Top Shelf/IDW)
  • Tony Sandoval, Watersnakes (Magnetic/Lion Forge)
  • Jen Wang, The Prince and the Dressmaker (First Second)

Best Penciller/Inker or Penciller/Inker Team
  • Matías BergaraCoda (BOOM!)
  • Mitch Gerads, Mister Miracle (DC)
  • Karl Kerschl, Isola (Image)
  • Sonny Liew, Eternity Girl (Vertigo/DC)
  • Sean Phillips, Kill or Be Killed, My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies (Image)
  • Yanick Paquette, Wonder Woman Earth One, vol. 2 (DC)

 

ImageBest Cover Artist (for multiple covers)
  • Jen Bartel, Blackbird (Image); Submerged (Vault)
  • Nick Derington, Mister Miracle (DC)
  • Karl Kerschl, Isola (Image)
  • Joshua Middleton, Batgirl and Aquaman variants (DC)
  • Julian Tedesco, Hawkeye, Life of Captain Marvel (Marvel)

Best Coloring
  • Jordie Bellaire, Batgirl, Batman (DC); The Divided Earth (First Second); Days of Hate, Dead Hand, Head Lopper, Redlands (Image); Shuri, Doctor Strange (Marvel)
  • Tamra Bonvillain, Alien 3 (Dark Horse); Batman, Doom Patrol (DC); Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur, Multiple Man (Marvel)
  • Nathan Fairbairn, Batman, Batgirl, Birds of Prey, Wonder Woman Earth One, vol. 2 (DC); Die!Die!Die! (Image)
  • Matt Hollingsworth, Batman: White Knight (DC): Seven to Eternity, Wytches (Image)
  • Matt Wilson, Black Cloud, Paper Girls, The Wicked + The Divine (Image); The Mighty Thor, Runaways (Marvel)

ImageBest Lettering
  • David Aja, Seeds (Berger Books/Dark Horse)
  • Jim Campbell, BreathlessCalexit, Gravetrancers, Snap Flash Hustle, Survival FetishThe Wilds (Black Mask); AbbottAlice: Dream to Dream, Black Badge, CluelessCodaFenceFireflyGiant DaysGrass Kings, Lumberjanes: The Infernal CompassLow Road WestSparrowhawk (BOOM); Angelic (Image); Wasted Space (Vault)
  • Alex de Campi, Bad Girls (Gallery 13); Twisted Romance (Image)
  • Jared Fletcher, Batman: Damned (DC); The Gravediggers Union, Moonshine, Paper Girls, Southern Bastards (Image)
  • Todd Klein— Black Hammer: Age of Doom, Neil Gaiman’s A Study in Emerald (Dark Horse); Batman: White Night (DC); Eternity Girl, Books of Magic (Vertigo/DC); The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Tempest (Top Shelf/IDW)

Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism –

TIE

  • Back Issue, edited by Michael Eury (TwoMorrows)
  • The Columbus Scribbler, edited by Brian Canini, Jack Wallace, Steve Steiner, and Derek Baxter columbusscribbler.com
  • Comicosity, edited by Aaron Long and Matt Santori,  www.comicosity.com
  • LAAB Magazine #0: Dark Matter, edited by Ronald Wimberley and Josh O’Neill (Beehive Books)
  • PanelxPanel magazine, edited by Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou, panelxpanel.com

ImageBest Painter/Multimedia Artist (interior art)
  • Lee Bermejo, Batman: Damned (DC)
  • Carita Lupatelli, Izuna Book 2 (Humanoids)
  • Dustin Nguyen, Descender (Image)
  • Gregory Panaccione, A Sea of Love (Magnetic/Lion Forge)
  • Tony Sandoval, Watersnakes (Magnetic/Lion Forge)
Best Comics-Related Book
  • Comic Book Implosion: An Oral History of DC Comics Circa 1978, by Keith Dallas and John Wells (TwoMorrows)
  • Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists, by Martha H. Kennedy (University Press of Mississippi)
  • The League of Regrettable Sidekicks, by Jon Morris (Quirk Books)
  • Mike Grell: Life Is Drawing Without an Eraser, by Dewey Cassell with Jeff Messer (TwoMorrows)
  • Yoshitaka Amano: The Illustrated Biography—Beyond the Fantasy, by Florent Gorges, translated by Laure Dupont and Annie Gullion (Dark Horse)

Best Academic/Scholarly Work
  • Between Pen and Pixel: Comics, Materiality, and the Book of the Future, by Aaron Kashtan (Ohio State University Press)
  • Breaking the Frames: Populism and Prestige in Comics Studies, by Marc Singer (University of Texas Press)
  • The Goat-Getters: Jack Johnson, the Fight of the Century, and How a Bunch of Raucous Cartoonists Reinvented Comics, by Eddie Campbell (Library of American Comics/IDW/Ohio State University Press)
  • Incorrigibles and Innocents, Constructing Childhood and Citizenship in Progressive Era Comics, by Lara Saguisag (Rutgers University Press)
  • Sweet Little C*nt: The Graphic Work of Julie Doucet, by Anne Elizabeth Moore (Uncivilized Books)

Best Publication Design
  • A Sea of Love, designed by Wilfrid Lupano, Grégory Panaccione, and Mike Kennedy (Magnetic/Lion Forge)
  • The Stan Lee Story Collector’s Edition, designed by Josh Baker (Taschen)
  • The Temple of Silence: Forgotten Worlds of Herbert Crowley, designed by Paul Kepple and Max Vandenberg (Beehive Books)
  • Terry Moore’s Strangers in Paradise Gallery Edition, designed by Josh Beatman/Brainchild Studios/NYC, (Abstract Studio/Graphitti Designs)
  • Will Eisner’s A Contract with God: Curator’s Collection, designed by John Lind (Kitchen Sink/Dark Horse)

Best Digital Comic

Best Webcomic

 

Image

Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez

Image

 

 

The judge’s choices for this year’s Will Eisner Hall of Fame Inductees included Jim Aparo, Dave Stevens, June Tarpé Mills, and Morrie Turner. Winners of voter’s choice were Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez, Jenette Kahn, Paul Levitz, Wendy and Richard Pini, and Bill Sienkiewicz.

 

EYG would like to congratulate all the winners and all those deserving nominees for this year’s Eisner Awards.  Couple of my own shout outs/comments…

  • I absolutely LOVED Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spider-Man #310 and I am thrilled that it won the Best Single Issue/One Shot.  It was one of the best Spidey stories in years.
  • I wanted The Immortal Hulk to win Best Ongoing Series.  I do not read Giant Days, but this has been the best version of the Hulk on the page in years!
  • The Vision is one of my all-time favorite story arcs and I an very excited that it won for Best Graphic Album-Reprint.  
  • It sure seems that Tom King is an Eisner favorite!  Well deserved because he is awesome!

Lois Lane #1

Image result for Lois Lane #1 variant cover

Lois Lane #1

Enemy of the People Part One

Writer:  Greg Rucka

Artist:  Mike Perkins

Cover Art:  Jenny Frison

Whoa, same week, two non-Marvel books.  Who would’ve thunk it?

I picked up the Lois Lane #1 book from DC Comics simply because I really liked the variant cover that was on display.  It is the one used on this review and it was an eye-catcher.  Jenny Frison was the artist and a cover should help attract people to your book.  This certainly worked on me.

I wound up enjoying the story as well.  It was a very topical, political story involving Lois Lane investigating some topics that may just have some familiarity to them.  Especially if you pay any attention to the news today.  While I prefer my politics to stay out of the comics, this was well done and came at it with an angle that was unexpected.

I like dhow they kept Clark Kent’s role in her story at a minimum.  The book was about Lois, although there was one surprising cameo in the story.

I did like this, but I am not sure I want to commit to 12 issues of the series.  If you are a DC fan, this is a book that you cannot miss.  For me, I have to consider what I am going to do with it.

tryit

Image result for Lois Lane #1 variant cover

2019 Will Eisner Comic Industry Award Nominees

Image result for 2019 eisner award nominees

Eisner Awards to be revealed at San Diego Comic Con on July 19, at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel.

 

Best Short Story
  • “Get Naked in Barcelona,” by Steven T. Seagle and Emei Olivia Burell, in Get Naked (Image)
  • “The Ghastlygun Tinies,” by Matt Cohen and Marc Palm, in MAD magazine #4 (DC)
  • “Here I Am,” by Shaun Tan, in I Feel Machine (SelfMadeHero)
  • “Life During Interesting Times,” by Mike Dawson (The Nib)
  • “Supply Chains,” by Peter and Maria Hoey, in Coin-Op #7 (Coin-Op Books)
  • “The Talk of the Saints,” by Tom King and Jason Fabok, in Swamp Thing Winter Special (DC)

Best Single Issue/One-Shot
  • Beneath the Dead Oak Tree, by Emily Carroll (ShortBox)
  • Black Hammer: Cthu-Louise, by Jeff Lemire and Emi Lenox (Dark Horse)
  • No Better Words, by Carolyn Nowak (Silver Sprocket)
  • Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man #310, by Chip Zdarsky (Marvel)
  • The Terrible Elisabeth Dumn Against the Devils In Suits, by Arabson, translated by James Robinson (IHQ Studio/ Image)

Image result for Immortal hulkBest Continuing Series
  • Batman, by Tom King et al. (DC)
  • Black Hammer: Age of Doom, by Jeff Lemire, Dean Ormston, and Rich Tommaso (Dark Horse)
  • Gasolina, by Sean Mackiewicz and Niko Walter (Skybound/Image)
  • Giant Days, by John Allison, Max Sarin, and Julaa Madrigal (BOOM! Box)
  • The Immortal Hulk, by Al Ewing, Joe Bennett, and Ruy José (Marvel)
  • Runaways, by Rainbow Rowell and Kris Anka (Marvel)

Best Limited Series
  • Batman: White Knight, by Sean Murphy (DC)
  • Eternity Girl, by Magdalene Visaggio and Sonny Liew (Vertigo/DC)
  • Exit Stage Left: The Snagglepuss Chronicles, by Mark Russell, Mike Feehan, and Mark Morales (DC)
  • Mister Miracle, by Tom King and Mitch Gerads (DC)
  • X-Men: Grand Design: Second Genesis, by Ed Piskor (Marvel)

Image result for man eaters chelsea cainBest New Series
  • Bitter Root, by David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene (Image)
  • Crowded, by Christopher Sebela, Ro Stein, and Ted Brandt (Image)
  • Gideon Falls, by Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino (Image)
  • Isola, by Brenden Fletcher and Karl Kerschl (Image)
  • Man-Eaters, by Chelsea Cain, Lia Miternique and Kate Niemczyk (Image)
  • Skyward, by Joe Henderson and Lee Garbett (Image)

Best Publication for Early Readers (up to age 8)
  • Johnny Boo and the Ice Cream Computer, by James Kochalka (Top Shelf/IDW)
  • Petals, by Gustavo Borges (KaBOOM!)
  • Peter & Ernesto: A Tale of Two Sloths, by Graham Annable (First Second)
  • This Is a Taco! By Andrew Cangelose and Josh Shipley (CubHouse/Lion Forge)
  • Tiger Vs. Nightmare, by Emily Tetri (First Second)

Best Publication for Kids (ages 9–12)
  • Aquicorn Cove, by Katie O’Neill (Oni)
  • Be Prepared, by Vera Brosgol (First Second)
  • The Cardboard Kingdom, by Chad Sell (Knopf/Random House Children’s Books)
  • Crush, by Svetlana Chmakova (JY/Yen Press)
  • The Divided Earth, by Faith Erin Hicks (First Second)

Best Publication for Teens (ages 13–17)
  • All Summer Long, by Hope Larson (Farrar Straus Giroux)
  • Gumballs, by Erin Nations (Top Shelf/IDW)
  • Middlewest, by Skottie Young and Jorge Corona (Image)
  • Norroway, Book 1: The Black Bull of Norroway, by Cat Seaton and Kit Seaton (Image)
  • The Prince and the Dressmaker, by Jen Wang (First Second)
  • Watersnakes, by Tony Sandoval, translated by Lucas Marangon (Magnetic/Lion Forge)

Best Humor Publication
  • Get Naked, by Steven T. Seagle et al. (Image)
  • Giant Days, by John Allison, Max Sarin, and Julia Madrigal (BOOM! Box)
  • MAD magazine, edited by Bill Morrison (DC)
  • A Perfect Failure: Fante Bukowski 3, by Noah Van Sciver (Fantagraphics)
  • Woman World, by Aminder Dhaliwal (Drawn & Quarterly)

Best Anthology
  • Femme Magnifique: 50 Magnificent Women Who Changed the World, edited by Shelly Bond (Black Crown/IDW)
  • Puerto Rico Strong, edited by Marco Lopez, Desiree Rodriguez, Hazel Newlevant, Derek Ruiz, and Neil Schwartz (Lion Forge)
  • Twisted Romance, edited by Alex de Campi (Image)
  • Where We Live: A Benefit for the Survivors in Las Vegas, edited by Will Dennis, curated by J. H. Williams III and Wendy Wright-Williams (Image)

Best Reality-Based Work
  • All the Answers: A Graphic Memoir, by Michael Kupperman (Gallery 13)
  • All the Sad Songs, by Summer Pierre (Retrofit/Big Planet)
  • Is This Guy For Real? The Unbelievable Andy Kaufman, by Box Brown (First Second)
  • Monk! by Youssef Daoudi (First Second)
  • One Dirty Tree, by Noah Van Sciver (Uncivilized Books)

Image result for green lantern earth 1 vol 1Best Graphic Album—New
  • Bad Girls, by Alex de Campi and Victor Santos (Gallery 13)
  • Come Again, by Nate Powell (Top Shelf/IDW)
  • Green Lantern: Earth One Vol. 1, by Corinna Bechko and Gabriel Hardman (DC)
  • Homunculus, by Joe Sparrow (ShortBox)
  • My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies, by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips (Image)
  • Sabrina, by Nick Drnaso (Drawn & Quarterly)

Image result for vision hardcover reprintBest Graphic Album—Reprint
  • Berlin, by Jason Lutes (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Girl Town, by Carolyn Nowak (Top Shelf/IDW)
  • Upgrade Soul, by Ezra Claytan Daniels (Lion Forge)
  • The Vision hardcover, by Tom King, Gabriel Hernandez Walta, and Michael Walsh (Marvel)
  • Young Frances, by Hartley Lin (AdHouse Books)

Best Adaptation from Another Medium
  • Anne Frank’s Diary: The Graphic Adaptation, adapted by Ari Folman and David Polonsky (Pantheon)
  • “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley, in Frankenstein: Junji Ito Story Collection, adapted by Junji Ito, translated by Jocelyne Allen (VIZ Media)
  • Out in the Open by Jesús Carraso, adapted by Javi Rey, translated by Lawrence Schimel (SelfMadeHero)
  • Speak: The Graphic Novel, by Laurie Halse Anderson and Emily Carroll (Farrar Straus Giroux)
  • To Build a Fire: Based on Jack London’s Classic Story, by Chabouté (Gallery 13)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material
  • About Betty’s Boobby Vero Cazot and Julie Rocheleau, translated by Edward Gauvin (Archaia/BOOM!)
  • Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World, by Pénélope Bagieu, translated by Montana Kane (First Second)
  • Herakles Book 1, by Edouard Cour, translated by Jeremy Melloul (Magnetic/Lion Forge)
  • Niourk, by Stefan Wul and Olivier Vatine, translated by Brandon Kander and Diana Schutz (Dark Horse)
  • A Sea of Love, by Wilfrid Lupano and Grégory Panaccione (Magnetic/Lion Forge)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material—Asia
  • Abara: Complete Deluxe Edition, by Tsutomu Nihei, translated by Sheldon Drzka (VIZ Media)
  • Dead Dead Demon’s Dededede Destruction, by Inio Asano, translated by John Werry (VIZ Media)
  • Laid-Back Camp, by Afro, translated by Amber Tamosaitis (Yen Press)
  • My Beijing: Four Stories of Everyday Wonder, by Nie Jun, translated by Edward Gauvin (Graphic Universe/Lerner)
  • Tokyo Tarareba Girls, by Akiko Higashimura (Kodansha)

Image result for Star Wars: Classic Newspaper Strips, vol. 3Best Archival Collection/Project—Strips
  • Pogo, vol. 5: Out of This World At Home, by Walt Kelly, edited by Mark Evanier and Eric Reynolds (Fantagraphics)
  • Sky Masters of the Space Force: The Complete Sunday Strips in Color (1959–1960), by Jack Kirby, Wally Wood et al., edited by Ferran Delgado (Amigo Comics)
  • Star Wars: Classic Newspaper Strips, vol. 3, by Archie Goodwin and Al Williamson, edited by Dean Mullaney (Library of American Comics/IDW)
  • The Temple of Silence: Forgotten Words and Worlds of Herbert Crowley, by Justin Duerr (Beehive Books
  • Thimble Theatre and the Pre-Popeye Comics of E. C. Segar, edited by Peter Maresca (Sunday Press)

Best Archival Collection/Project—Comic Books
  • Action Comics: 80 Years of Superman Deluxe Edition, edited by Paul Levitz (DC)
  • Bill Sienkiewicz’s Mutants and Moon Knights… And Assassins… Artifact Edition, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW)
  • Dirty Plotte: The Complete Julie Doucet (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Madman Quarter Century Shindig, by Mike Allred, edited by Chris Ryall (IDW)
  • Terry Moore’s Strangers in Paradise Gallery Edition, edited by Bob Chapman, Joseph Melchior, and Terry Moore (Abstract Studio/Graphitti Designs)
  • Will Eisner’s A Contract with God: Curator’s Collection, edited by John Lind (Kitchen Sink/Dark Horse)

Related imageBest Writer
  • Alex de Campi, Bad Girls (Gallery 13); Twisted Romance (Image)
  • Tom King, Batman, Mister Miracle, Heroes in Crisis, Swamp Thing Winter Special (DC)
  • Jeff Lemire, Black Hammer: Age of Doom, Doctor Star & the Kingdom of Lost Tomorrows, Quantum Age (Dark Horse); Descender, Gideon Falls, Royal City (Image)
  • Mark Russell, Exit Stage Left: The Snagglepuss Chronicles, Green Lantern/Huckleberry Hound, Lex Luthor/Porky Pig (DC); Lone Ranger (Dynamite)
  • Kelly Thompson, Nancy Drew (Dynamite); Hawkeye, Jessica Jones, Mr. & Mrs. X, Rogue & Gambit, Uncanny X-Men, West Coast Avengers (Marvel)
  • Chip Zdarsky, Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man, Marvel Two-in-One (Marvel)

Best Writer/Artist
  • Sophie Campbell, Wet Moon (Oni)
  • Nick Drnaso, Sabrina (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • David Lapham, Lodger (Black Crown/IDW); Stray Bullets (Image)
  • Nate Powell, Come Again (Top Shelf/IDW)
  • Tony Sandoval, Watersnakes (Magnetic/Lion Forge)
  • Jen Wang, The Prince and the Dressmaker (First Second)

Image result for mitch geradsBest Penciller/Inker or Penciller/Inker Team
  • Matías BergaraCoda (BOOM!)
  • Mitch Gerads, Mister Miracle (DC)
  • Karl Kerschl, Isola (Image)
  • Sonny Liew, Eternity Girl (Vertigo/DC)
  • Sean Phillips, Kill or Be Killed, My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies (Image)
  • Yanick Paquette, Wonder Woman Earth One, vol. 2 (DC)

Best Painter/Multimedia Artist (interior art)
  • Lee Bermejo, Batman: Damned (DC)
  • Carita Lupatelli, Izuna Book 2 (Humanoids)
  • Dustin Nguyen, Descender (Image)
  • Gregory Panaccione, A Sea of Love (Magnetic/Lion Forge)
  • Tony Sandoval, Watersnakes (Magnetic/Lion Forge)

Image result for julian tedesco life of captain marvel coverBest Cover Artist (for multiple covers)
  • Jen Bartel, Blackbird (Image); Submerged (Vault)
  • Nick Derington, Mister Miracle (DC)
  • Karl Kerschl, Isola (Image)
  • Joshua Middleton, Batgirl and Aquaman variants (DC)
  • Julian Tedesco, Hawkeye, Life of Captain Marvel (Marvel)

Best Coloring
  • Jordie Bellaire, Batgirl, Batman (DC); The Divided Earth (First Second); Days of Hate, Dead Hand, Head Lopper, Redlands (Image); Shuri, Doctor Strange (Marvel)
  • Tamra Bonvillain, Alien 3 (Dark Horse); Batman, Doom Patrol (DC); Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur, Multiple Man (Marvel)
  • Nathan Fairbairn, Batman, Batgirl, Birds of Prey, Wonder Woman Earth One, vol. 2 (DC); Die!Die!Die! (Image)
  • Matt Hollingsworth, Batman: White Knight (DC): Seven to Eternity, Wytches (Image)
  • Matt Wilson, Black Cloud, Paper Girls, The Wicked + The Divine (Image); The Mighty Thor, Runaways (Marvel)

Best Lettering
  • David Aja, Seeds (Berger Books/Dark Horse)
  • Jim Campbell, BreathlessCalexit, Gravetrancers, Snap Flash Hustle, Survival FetishThe Wilds (Black Mask); AbbottAlice: Dream to Dream, Black Badge, CluelessCodaFenceFireflyGiant DaysGrass Kings, Lumberjanes: The Infernal CompassLow Road WestSparrowhawk (BOOM); Angelic (Image); Wasted Space (Vault)
  • Alex de Campi, Bad Girls (Gallery 13); Twisted Romance (Image)
  • Jared Fletcher, Batman: Damned (DC); The Gravediggers Union, Moonshine, Paper Girls, Southern Bastards (Image)
  • Todd Klein— Black Hammer: Age of Doom, Neil Gaiman’s A Study in Emerald (Dark Horse); Batman: White Night (DC); Eternity Girl, Books of Magic (Vertigo/DC); The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Tempest (Top Shelf/IDW)

Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism
  • Back Issue, edited by Michael Eury (TwoMorrows)
  • The Columbus Scribbler, edited by Brian Canini, Jack Wallace, Steve Steiner, and Derek Baxter columbusscribbler.com
  • Comicosity, edited by Aaron Long and Matt Santori,  www.comicosity.com
  • LAAB Magazine #0: Dark Matter, edited by Ronald Wimberley and Josh O’Neill (Beehive Books)
  • PanelxPanel magazine, edited by Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou, panelxpanel.com

Image result for The League of Regrettable SidekicksBest Comics-Related Book
  • Comic Book Implosion: An Oral History of DC Comics Circa 1978, by Keith Dallas and John Wells (TwoMorrows)
  • Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists, by Martha H. Kennedy (University Press of Mississippi)
  • The League of Regrettable Sidekicks, by Jon Morris (Quirk Books)
  • Mike Grell: Life Is Drawing Without an Eraser, by Dewey Cassell with Jeff Messer (TwoMorrows)
  • Yoshitaka Amano: The Illustrated Biography—Beyond the Fantasy, by Florent Gorges, translated by Laure Dupont and Annie Gullion (Dark Horse)

Best Academic/Scholarly Work
  • Between Pen and Pixel: Comics, Materiality, and the Book of the Future, by Aaron Kashtan (Ohio State University Press)
  • Breaking the Frames: Populism and Prestige in Comics Studies, by Marc Singer (University of Texas Press)
  • The Goat-Getters: Jack Johnson, the Fight of the Century, and How a Bunch of Raucous Cartoonists Reinvented Comics, by Eddie Campbell (Library of American Comics/IDW/Ohio State University Press)
  • Incorrigibles and Innocents, Constructing Childhood and Citizenship in Progressive Era Comics, by Lara Saguisag (Rutgers University Press)
  • Sweet Little C*nt: The Graphic Work of Julie Doucet, by Anne Elizabeth Moore (Uncivilized Books)

Best Publication Design
  • A Sea of Love, designed by Wilfrid Lupano, Grégory Panaccione, and Mike Kennedy (Magnetic/Lion Forge)
  • The Stan Lee Story Collector’s Edition, designed by Josh Baker (Taschen)
  • The Temple of Silence: Forgotten Worlds of Herbert Crowley, designed by Paul Kepple and Max Vandenberg (Beehive Books)
  • Terry Moore’s Strangers in Paradise Gallery Edition, designed by Josh Beatman/Brainchild Studios/NYC, (Abstract Studio/Graphitti Designs)
  • Will Eisner’s A Contract with God: Curator’s Collection, designed by John Lind (Kitchen Sink/Dark Horse)

Best Digital Comic

Best Webcomic

 

Image result for The Stan Lee Story Collector’s Edition, designed by Josh Baker (Taschen)

List source:  https://www.comic-con.org/awards/2019-will-eisner-comic-industry-award-nominees

Sea of Stars #1

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Sea of Stars #1

“Lost in the Heavens”

Writer:  Jason Aaron & Dennis Hallum

Artist:  Stephen Green

Cover Art: Mike Mignola

Yes, this is an Image Comic book, the first non-Marvel or DC book that I have reviewed in the Comics This Week section.  Yes, this is uncommon for me, as I am mostly a Marvel guy, but I was at Comic World and Games, my comic shop, today talking with the owner Ben about some writers and I mentioned that I liked Jason Aaron’s work.  Ben suggested that I check out this book, Sea of Stars #1, because he had read it and he connected with it.  It was his last copy on the shelf so I said I would take it and look at it.

I have to say, it was a very solid story and I enjoyed it enough to add it to my pull list, once again, which is very uncommon for a non-Marvel title.

Sea of Stars#1 is the story of a father and a son traveling in space.  They implied that the mother was gone and the father had to bring his son Kadyn along with him on his job transporting goods for the Krogarrian Museum of Space History.  As things do in these sort of stories, the ship they were on was attacked and the father/son were separated.  Kadyn winds up on an alien planet with some weird creatures who are considering eating him and the father is ready to come find him.

The sci-fi story works very well because at the heart of the story is the relationship between the father and son.  They have a problem between them, in this case it looks like the loss of the mother/wife, and the pair is not sure what to do with one another.  The tragic circumstances lead to the understanding of how much they mean to each other.

The book is a lot of set up for what is going to happen, but, as I have said before, I like stuff like that.  Set up indicates that you deal with characterization and I like a slow burn if it deals with characters.  We spend the first half of this book learning about our two protagonists here setting up the moment when they are ripped apart.

There are some wonderful pieces of art within this story, especially at the moment when the two of them are being torn away from each other.

I do like the start of this series and I will be picking it up as we continue.  I hope this is a book that I can continue to look forward to and not a book that winds up getting lost in the pile of books to be read.

ReadIt

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Loki#1

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Loki #1

“The God Who Fell to Earth”

Chapter One: Happily Ever After

Writer:  Daniel Kibblesmith

Artist:  Oscar Bazaldua

Cover Art:  Ozgur Yildirim

Hot off the underwhelming The War of the Realms series is a fully enjoyable and fun Loki #1, written by Daniel Kibblesmith, a comedy writer from The Late Show with Stephen Colbert and a former editor of Clickhole, and drawn by Oscar Bazaldua.

I was really entertained by this issue.  I found the story quick and easy to follow (not always the case with some of the Norse myth-based Marvel heroes) and the dialogue, especially from Loki, was sharp, witty and hilarious.

Frosti may be my favorite new character from Marvel Comics in decades.

Kibblesmith caught the exact tone and essence of the character of Loki beautifully.  Loki is the God of Mischief and you catch the sense of that in this book.  There are some great scenes with Loki and his brother Thor, a relationship that is as complicated as any sibling relationship in comic book history.

We may not know what path this story takes, though the final page is one that really begs for some questions, but what starts here is fantastic characterization of one of Marvel Comics’ most classic villains in an engaging and entertaining manner.

Shout out as well to Oscar Bazaldua, an artist from the Mrs. and Mrs. X book, whose art looks to be the perfect touch for this series.

I am very positive for this series and I am really looking forward to see where it goes from here.  The comedy here is very smart and subtle and I have not found a comic this funny since the days of Chelsea Cain’s Mockingbird, which is one of my all-time favorite series.  I have very high hopes for Loki moving forward in the Marvel Universe.

excelsior

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Wolverine & Captain America: Weapon Plus#1

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Wolverine & Captain America: Weapon Plus#1

“The Last Best Hope for Earth”

Writer:  Ethan Sacks

Artist:  Diogenes Neves

Cover Art:  Skan

Marvel Comics has continued the “Weapon” storyline that they have run for years.  I believe I already knew that Wolverine’s Weapon X was just an offshoot of the Super Soldier program (I think… at least I am pretty sure).  It was not an uncommon theme as in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the program that created the Hulk was also trying to recreate the Super Soldier Serum.

The hook in Weapon Plus is that Captain America not only inspired the heroic, good deeds of people, but also inspired bad people to move forward with their experimentation and in their attempts to create a new Captain America.

We meet an especially unsteady young man named Billy Junger, who was desperately trying to become a new Captain America and was influential to the continuation of the program.

We find much of the information from a hologram of the deceased Fantomex, who serves as a basic exposition dump.  Wolverine finds Cap and the pair head off to take care of the problem.  They come across some horrendous experiments that were still viable.

The art is decent, but I would not say it stood out.  The story was okay, but nothing too great.  I am not sure exactly what here was new information and what was retread from past history.  I do like the counter balance of Cap and Wolvie together as they make a diametrically opposed partnership, but there was not that much of that between them in this issue.

I am interested enough to continue reading this series, as much because of the interesting possibilities that could come from the story as for anything that I actually saw in issue number one.  Hopefully the bombshells become more explosive to justify the mini series.

tryit

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Wolverine vs. Blade#1

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Wolverine vs. Blade #1

Writer:  Marc Guggenheim

Artist:  Dave Wilkins

Cover Art:  Dave Wilkins

A special one shot featuring everyone’s favorite Canadian mutant with claws and everyone’s favorite killer of vampires who is also a vampire was released today matching up the Avenger and the X-Man.

Blade and Wolverine fight is a small section of the story and the rest is your typical team-up.

Despite the fact that the comic is larger than a normal comic, the story of the book felt very rushed.  With everything that the comic tried to set up, bringing together these two iconic figures from Marvel was just too crammed.

The book is listed as “Mature Content” which meant that there were graphic ways that the two heroes would kill these vampires.  There was no language, but the violence quota was off the charts.  Some of that was fun, but it turned out to be at the expense of a comprehensive story.

The art, however, is really well done.  It was dark and violent, fitting perfectly in with what the story was going for.  Unfortunately, there was very little depth to the tale.  It was basically an excuse to draw Wolverine cutting a vampire’s head in three with his claws.  If that is enough for you, then this book will be right up your alley.

For me, I wanted more.  It was a passable comic, especially for the art, but there was little else to it.

underwhelmComics

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Invisible Woman #1

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Invisible Woman #1

Writer: Mark Waid

Artist: Mattia De Iulis

Cover Art:  Adam Hughes

For the first time ever, Susan Storm Richards stars in her won solo series at Marvel Comics and, I have to say, it caught me off guard.  It revealed something of the character of Sue Storm that I did not know or did not expect.

Apparently, Sue has been, I guess in her spare time, been working on and off as a spy, first for SHIELD and more recently for the government.  We start with a bit where she is working for our original Nick Fury and later on, new Nick Fury arrives too.

The idea makes a lot of sense.  What wouldn’t be more effective as a spy than someone who can turn themselves invisible?  It seemed Sue had been involved for years (as the book shows a scene from “ten years ago”).

The twist of the book worked really well for me and I found myself intrigued immediately.  When the government came back to Sue to ask her what she knew about the disappearance of a former partner, Aiden, she wanted to go into the field to find him.  The government seemed to be unwilling to agree, but they did not know Sue very well.

The art is beautifully rendered by Mattia DeIulis.  The story itself is mainly set up, but it reads quickly and does a great job of constructing the story and finishes with an awesome cameo at the end.

Honestly, I am excited to see what happens next.  I love the fact that they are able to throw a new wrinkle into the world of the Invisible Woman and make it feel organic.  I believe this is a mini series, and I hope the level of quality remains this high.

Awesomeness

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Fantastic Four: The Prodigal Sun #1

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Fantastic Four: The Prodigal Sun #1

Writer:  Peter David

Artist:  Francesco Manna

Cover Art:  Mico Suayan & Rain Beredo

We are introduced to a brand new hero in the Marvel Universe and he goes by the name Prodigal.  We learn very little about him in this issue as he lands in the Savage Land and draws the attention of Ka-Zar and Shanna, who contact the Fantastic Four for help.

We do learn that his real name is Prah’dGul and he claims to be the greatest warrior in the five galaxies.

Prodigal meets up with Rojash and the Swamp People in the Savage Land and they are trying to get some weapons found inside the High Evolutionary’s old lab.

Honestly, my first opinion on Prodigy is a bit lackluster.  He was very arrogant without any reason, or at least none that we have been given.  There is little else that we have found out about him.  The dialogue of the character was not a strength, as he used a lot of snippy remarks that are intended to be funny, but seem to fall flat for me.

Honestly, I was much more interested in the meeting of Ka-Zar and Shanna’s son Matt Plunder, who has apparently fallen into some kind of time portal in Lemuria and aged to a teenager, and Valeria Richards, daughter of Reed and Sue.  I would want more of this.

It appears as if the character of Prodigal is being introduced across several one-shot issues like this one, with the next issue being a Silver Surfer crossover.  Not sure how I feel about this character yet as we really get very little about him.  He is very powerful and knows it and he wants to find a spaceship to get off the planet earth.

I’d really like more Ka-Zar and more Matt and Valeria.  Other than that, Prodigal is a we’ll see.

tryit

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Aero #1

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Aero#1

“Protector of the City”

Writer:  Zhou Liefen

Artist: Keng

Cover Art: Keng

“Aero & Wave: Origins & Destinies” Part One

Writer:  Greg Pak

Artist:  Pop Mhan

Aero debuted in the recent limited series The New Agents of Atlas which debuted during The War of the Realms crossover event.  That was one of the few favorites of mine during the event, so I was excited to read the new book with Aero.

Admittedly, the characterization was not top priority in The New Agents of Atlas and I did not learn a ton about Aero or any of the other new characters introduced in that series.  However, that means that there is some room for this series to give me more about this character and I did like what was here.

In fact, the set up of the first story of the book was intriguing with a building that was coming to life in Aero’s city, Shanghai.  I really liked the way that first story ended too because I did not expect it and I found it interesting.

I also got to see a little bit about who this character is, though I would like even more as this series goes on.  The book uses Aero’s voice as the narrator and it is able to reveal to us some of her thoughts as it progresses, which I liked.

The art is beautiful and uses lots of large imagery to tell the story.  I really enjoyed Keng and his artistry.

The second story is used to introduce to us further another of the characters we met in The New Agents of Atlas in Wave.  It is a basic origin story, but I was engaged with it.

Overall, I enjoyed this book and I expect that I will give it a chance moving forward.  I hope we learn more about Aero as we move on and continue to see such beautiful art work that has a manga feel to it.

ReadIt

 

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The War of the Realms #6

War of the Realms #6

The War of the Realms #6

“Chapter Six:  The Storm of Thors”

Writer:  Jason Aaron

Artist:  Russell Dauterman

Cover Art:  Arthur Adams & Matthew Wilson

I have been fairly disappointed with the ongoing The War of the Realms story that has spanned across much of the Marvel Comics line for the last few months.  There has been tons of crossovers and most of them have been lesser than what one might expect.  I have not been a huge fan of the main series.  So I was looking forward to the series ending and it does so with number six.

It turned out that The War of the Realms #6 was not bad.  It was probably my favorite of the six issues.

I am not sure what the purpose of the series was meant to be.  It seemed as if the entire run was basically to make adjustments to the character of Thor.  Jason Aaron brought back some of the characters he created back in his awesome run on Thor from a few years ago and they were fun. It just does not seem to be enough to give a huge crossover event.  This could have been done in Thor (or maybe the Avengers).  Most of the rest of the Marvel Universe was just there as cameos and it did not feel needed.

It looks as if there is a bunch of new Thor or Thor-type comics coming out of this.  I am not sure what those books will be like.

The War of the Realms are over.  It ended with more of a punch than most of the series.  However, the entire series was not good enough.

underwhelmComics

War of the Realms #6

 

Superman Year One Book One

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Superman Year One, Book One

Writer: Frank Miller

Artist: John Romita Jr.

Cover Art: Frank Miller

Yes I mostly read Marvel Comics, but I do keep my eyes open for those event type issues from DC Comics.  At least, some of the time, and a book created by Frank Miller and John Romita Jr about Superman’s early days would have to be considered a event.  Because of that, I picked up the over-sized number one.

This year one book focuses on Kal-El, the baby in the last days of Krypton to his childhood in Smallville, Kansas with Ma and Pa Kent.  The problem with this is that there really is no plot in the book.  There is a story arc involving a group of bullies that takes a darker path than I expected.  The book jumps from scene to scene without too much of a new thought or anything new to add.

The way the story is presented is one of the ways that felt uncomfortable for me.  The narrator explained a lot to the readers and felt as if the story was so full of exposition.  The dialogue was weak and uniformed and there were many times when I thought to myself that people did not talk that way.  I know it sounds weird, but one of the problems was the story written by Frank Miller.  Miller, who is a great writer who has written some of the greatest comic issues of all time, just never feels right with Clark Kent.  There is an awkwardness to the prose of the book.

I also like John Romita Jr and his art work in this issue, with the exception of his artistic renditions of the kids.  Why are their heads so big?  It really became distracting.

There really is nothing new here.  We all know the background of Clark Kent and his childhood in Smallville, and this issue gives us nothing that changes or adapts or adds anything to what we already knew.

underwhelmComics

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The Immortal Hulk #19

Immortal Hulk Vol 1 19

The Immortal Hulk #19

“Butterfly”

Writer: Al Ewing

Artist:  Joe Bennett

Cover Art: Alex Ross

Holy crap.

The Immortal Hulk has become a sensation at Marvel Comics.  Why has it done so well?  I believe it is the approach of writer Al Ewing, who has taken the character of the Hulk and placed him into the genre of horror.  It has been a great success as there have been some shockingly scary moments through the first 18 issues.

However, issue 19 takes it to another level.

Wow.  I cannot believe some of the things that I have seen.  The comic is remarkably compelling and shockingly graphic at times.  The artwork fits beautifully into the tone and feel of the presentations.

And the last five or six pages are just brilliantly gore-tastic that I’m amazed that I saw it in a comic book from Marvel.  I also have a hard time believing that what I saw happen, just happened.  Those final pages are set up throughout the entire issue, though you do not realize it until it is too late.

I can’t wait to find out what happens next.

The Immortal Hulk has been the best non-mini-series Marvel Comic of the year so far (and it has been great for its entire run) and you are missing some of the best work anywhere if you are not reading it.

excelsior

Immortal Hulk Vol 1 19

Silver Surfer: Black #1

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Silver Surfer: Black #1

“Black”

Writer:  Donny Cates

Artist:  Tradd Moore

Cover Art:  Tradd Moore

The Silver Surfer returns in a five-issue series written by Donny Cates and drawn by his longtime friend Tradd Moore.

I have always been a Silver Surfer fan, but I have never really loved any of the Silver Surfer solo books.  The last one with Dan Slott writing never tripped my trigger, so I approached Silver Surfer: Black with a question in my heart.

However, I found this book to be very good.

While I would not go as far as to say that it was great, Silver Surfer: Black #1 was a solid start to the series and I am looking forward to continuing it.  My one problem was that there was nothing that really happened that was new.  Basically, the status quo was maintained in the book.  It may set up the character the story to move ahead, kind of like a decent TV pilot.

Not sure what happened with Surfer’s hand.  I will reserve judgment on this once I understand exactly what is going on.

As for the art.  I typically do not like this type of artistic style, but I have to say that the galactic style it brought to the Silver Surfer felt so very right.  The art help to pop the story in an almost psychedelic style.  I have to say that I dug it.  It really worked for Silver Surfer and his space travels.

Then the final panel is strong, leading toward the arc of the story.  So as everything is set up in this issue, I think Silver Surfer” Black’s best days are yet to come.

Addendum:  There is a wonderful letter written in the letter’s column from the writer, Donny Cates about Stan Lee that is worth the read too.  It is touching.

Awesomeness

 

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Black Cat#1

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Black Cat #1

“Thieves Like Us”

Writer:  Jed Mackay

Artist: Travel Foreman

Cover Art:  J. Scott Campbell & Sabine Rich

“The Ongoing Adventures of The Black Cat and Her Purrfect Purrloiners”

Writer:  Nao Fuji

Artist:  Nao Fuji

“Leaving Miami”

Writer:  Jed Mackay

Artist:  Mike Dowling

One of my favorite secondary Spider-Man characters is Felicia Hardy, aka the Black Cat, so I was excited to see the first issue of the new series featuring our feline thief.

I am not sure I would have split this into the three shorter stories that are inside this issue.  I think I would have rather had a full first issue story and not have the two backup stories.  The first back up story is simply two pages and I am not sure how necessary it is.  The second back up story deals with the Black Fox and seems to feature Dracula.  That immediately made me wonder where this falls in Marvel continuity, because the last time I saw Dracula, he was in a Russian gulag and in really bad shape.

As for the main story here, I like the way Felicia is shown, but the comparisons to Catwoman is impossible to avoid.  I do like how the security guards at this museum know who Felicia is and her very presence causes chaos.  I like the two supporting cast members introduced here.

The comic makes a reference to Felicia’s super hero heist, which was used in Amazing Spider-man recently, so the Thieves Guild is still a problem for her.  This will most likely continue to expand as the series continues.

I would say that I liked this book fairly well and that I see some potentially strong stories that could be told.  I hope that the book continues to improve because I tend to pick up Spider-man related books (Silk, Scarlet Spider, Venom etc) only to fall behind reading them.  This, of ocurse, leads to me stopping buying them.  I would like to keep Black Cat going.

tryit

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