The Lady Vanishes (1938)

I love Alfred Hitchcock and his oeuvre of films. Everything from The Birds to Psycho to Rebecca and North by Northwest. I am still building my knowledge of Hitchcock films and so adding the 1938 film, The Lady Vanishes, to the list is a benefit of the DailyView.

Iris Henderson (Margaret Lockwood) was heading on a train to meet her fiancé when she got bopped on the head trying to return glasses to a middle aged English governess named Miss Froy (Dame May Whitty). Miss Froy helped Iris on the train and aided her as best she could.

However, Miss Froy disappeared and, to Iris’s chagrin, no one on the train can remember ever seeing her. In fact, everyone on the train outright denied that Iris had even talked to the woman or that she even existed.

Iris teamed up with an Englishman named Gilbert (Sir Michael Redgrave), whom she had met the night before and had a negative encounter with. They tried to discover what exactly was going on with the mysterious woman and the train.

This was a fun watch and I enjoyed the unfurling of the mystery. I will admit that the ending felt a little convoluted than I expected it to be, and the first 15-20 minutes was a tad slow. However, once the characters get on the train, then everything picks up.

There was a lot of good humor here too as several of the side characters on the train were silly and ridiculous. The humor helped to ease the tension of the mystery and kept the film progressing well.

While I may not place this movie in the upper echelon of Hitchcock films, The Lady Vanishes provided a great example of the strengths of Alfred Hitchcock as a storyteller and blends the thriller and comedy together expertly.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s